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Josh Brolin’s Peach Pie Recipe from ‘Labor Day’

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Labor DayToday is National Pie Day! Let’s celebrate with a recipe. Here’s the pie that Josh Brolin made every day on the set of “Labor Day,” for Kate Winslet and the cast, using Joyce Maynard’s family recipe.

The movie is based on Maynard’s  book “Labor Day.” At first, it sounded like it might be dark – like Brolin’s character is a bad guy. But the more I’ve read about the movie, the more I think I’ll really like it.

“Labor Day,” in theaters Jan. 31, 2014, centers on 13-year-old Henry Wheeler (Gattlin Griffith), who struggles to be the man of the house and care for his reclusive mother Adele (Winslet) while confronting all the pangs of adolescence.

On a back-to-school shopping trip, Henry and his mother encounter Frank Chambers (Brolin), a man both intimidating and clearly in need of help, who convinces them to take him into their home and later is revealed to be an escaped convict. The events of this long Labor Day weekend will shape them for the rest of their lives.

Below the recipe, check out the video of Maynard making an apple pie.

Josh Brolin’s Peach Pie from “Labor Day”

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds peaches
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup Crisco vegetable shortening
  • 1 stick plus 1 tablespoon chilled butter, cut into pieces
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup ice water
  • 2 tablespoons Minute tapioca (plus 2 additional tbsp to stir into peaches)
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Labor DayDirections:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the peaches, sugar, lemon juice, and cinnamon. Stir in 2 tbsp Minute Tapioca to help absorb juices. Let stand, stirring occasionally.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400°. In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt. Using a pastry blender, work in the shortening and 1 stick of butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the ice water over the flour mixture, stirring gently with a fork. Continue adding the water just until the dough holds together. Shape the dough into a ball and divide it into two discs, one slightly larger than the other.
  3. Place the smaller disc on a sheet of waxed paper, and use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough into a 12-inch circle. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin, dust it lightly with more flour. Lay a 9- to 10-inch pie pan face down on top of the circle; flip the pan over and remove the paper. For the crust, on a sheet of waxed paper, roll out the other disc to form a 14-inch circle. Do not roll the dough more than necessary.
  4. Sprinkle the tapioca on the bottom crust. Add the filling, mounding it in the center, and dot with 1 tablespoon butter. Lift the waxed paper with the remaining crust and flip it over the filling. Peel back waxed paper. Trim the edges of the crusts and pinch together the top and bottom crusts.
  5. Optional: Roll out the trimmings and cut into decorative shapes. Brush the pie with the egg, and arrange the shapes on the crust. Sprinkle with sugar. Poke fork holes or cut vents in the top crust. Bake 40 to 45 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve warm.
  6. Put pie plate on cookie sheet to catch drips. Bake in 350 degree oven for about one hour. Cool before serving.

Jane Boursaw is the founder and editor-in-chief of Reel Life With Jane. Her credits include hundreds of print and online publications, including The New York Times, People Magazine, Variety, Moviefone, TV Squad and more. Follow her on Twitter at @reellifejane.

Jane Boursaw has written posts on Reel Life With Jane.


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3 comments

  1. I can’t wait to see this movie for many reasons; one, because I had Maynard as a teacher in a summer workshop where she talked all about her pie-making.
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